Monday, April 2, 2018

Tex-Mex Enchilada Chilli Blend



Chili Peppers are blended for fruity, spicy, and aromatic effects to build the best possible taste. Ancho, Pasilla and Guajillo make up the “holy trinity” widely used through out Mexican cuisine. Add the smokiness of the Morita (smoked Chipotle) and the subtle fruity flavor of the Peruvian favorite aji Amarillo with hints of raisin, passion fruit and mango imparts additional unique flavor to the blend. To extend the spicy of the blend, we added ground hot New Mexican pods. As a variation, I cut back on the portion of hot New Mexican chili and add a single half-dose of ground Caribbean red Habanero which contributes a strong floral aroma. Using the Caribbean red Habanero variety will also add additional citrusy - smoke flavor. By adding beef bouillon, the flavor deepens for a more Tex-Mex flavor. Many of these powders are available from the Savory Spice Shop.



1 part Ancho powder
1 Part Guajillo powder
1 Part Mulato powder
1 Part Pasilla Negro Powder
1 Part Morita powder or use Chipotle for added smokiness
1 part Aji Amarillo powder
2~5 Parts of mild or hot New Mexico ground chile pow­der
1~2 parts beef bouillon (start with 1 part as is salty)
2 parts garlic powder

Directions:
Over medium heat, make a flour and rendered pork fat (Manteca) roux. Stir in 2~3 tablespoons of chili powder mix. Add 2 cups homemade rich chicken stock stirring until smooth.  Cook on low for an hour, adding water as necessary. Corrent the seasoning using more of any specific ingredient as required including salt until the flavor is perfect. Add sour cream to mellow the end result, if desired.

Orrington Farms Beef Flavored Broth Base



https://migardener.com/store/pepper-carribean-red-habanero/

Notes:

  1. Aji Amarillo Chile is also known as Aji escabeche and is sometimes referred to as Peruvian chiles or yellow peppers. They are from South America, predominantly Peru, where they are the most commonly used chile. The chile pods are 4-5 inches long and burnt orange in color. They have a thin flesh and are medium hot, rating a 6-7 on a heat scale of 1-10.
  2. Anchos are the sweetest of all dried chiles. Also known as poblano when fresh, they are only a 1 on heat scale of 1 to 10. Anchos are the most commonly used chile in their native Mexico, long used to thicken sauces and spice up tamales. The dark rich color of the whole chile isn’t lost in the grinding. In fact, the rich burgundy color of ground ancho can be found in many spice blends.
  3. Moritas, moras and Colorado chile peppers - Chipotles are fully ripened jalapenos, meaning they’ve been allowed to mature and turn red on the vine. They are dried by smoking and it takes about 10 pounds of fresh peppers to make one pound of dried. They register about 6 on heat scale of 1 to 10.
  4. Ground Guajillo - In Mexico this chile is second only to the ancho in common use. This quajillo chile powder has a tangy, pleasantly sharp taste with hints of berry and pine. The guajillo rates at a 3-4 on a heat scale of 1-10.
  5. Red Habaneros chiles -  are one of the hottest varieties of peppers known to man, measuring a whopping 175,000 to 300,000 Scoville units. That’s a 10 on a heat scale of 1 to 10. Underneath its superior heat level is a papaya and berry like flavor. Use ¼ teaspoon to start with, then taste.
  6. Mulato - originates in Mexico and is similar in appearance to an ancho, but its flavor is sweeter and has smoky characteristics. This large, flat chile is chocolate brown in color and rather mild, rating a 2-3 on a heat scale of 1-10. Commonly used in mole.
  7. Hot Red New Mexican - This chile is of the same variety grown in and around Chimayo, New Mexico. Only select New Mexican red chile pods are chosen for this excellent tasting gourmet powder. There is great care taken with the production as all the stems and seeds are removed before grinding, leaving a slightly sweeter and much smoother tasting chile powder.
  8. The pasilla negro is called for in many traditional Mexican recipes. Fresh pasilla negro is known as a Chilaca chile but it is the flavor that develops as it dries that is sought after; rich and berry like with noticeable notes of herbs. This dark purplish brown chile powder rates a 4-5 on a heat scale of 1-10.
 

1 comment:

  1. how much of the mixed chili powders do you add to the chicken stock mixture?

    ReplyDelete