Thursday, May 4, 2017

St Louis Style Ribs BBQ



St Louis style ribs are spare ribs trimmed of the sternum and flap ends, leaving just the most desirable parts. In preparation, these have their membrane removed, dry-rubbed with your favorite rub, and set aside overnight to marinate. I include a smoke component in the rub but little sugar as the sugar has a tendency to burn.
St Louis Style Spare Ribs

Removing the Membrane
Each slab has a meat side and a bone side. The bone side has a membrane called the pleura covering it. It can be leathery when cooked, and, ideally, it is removed and discarded. Many butchers remove the skin or may be asked to do this. If the membrane has not been removed, you should remove it yourself. In the middle of a rack, on the bone side, insert a fork tine between the membrane and the meat. Work a finger in to help separate the membrane. Use a paper towel for a better grip; gently begin peeling it off, trying not to rip it. If patient, you should be able to pull it all off in one long strip.         

Preheat the grill to medium 275-300F. Grill ribs for two hours on medium tuning once after first hour. Once the ribs have some char and color, enclose in a double wrap of heavy duty tinfoil. It is important to seal these so the moisture stays in while baking.
Pre-heat oven to 275 F.
Bake at 275 F for two hours. Let rest wrapped for 20 minutes, serve with one or more sauces on the side.

Mesquite and Chilies Rub

A good rub is a combination of fresh spices, seasonings and herbs. Overnight is often convenient - the prep time is the same but the depth of flavor is deeper.

Sea Salt
Mesquite Smoke Flavoring
Sweet paprika
Merken1 Mapuche Chile
Ground Pasilla Chile
Chile chipotle
Garlic powder
Black and white pepper
Onion powder
Sage
Thyme
Ground Makrut2 lime powder
Cascabel Chile

Notes:
  1. Merken is a traditional Chilean seasoning created by the indigenous Mapuche people. The local version is made from Goat’s Horn chile (aji cacho de cabra), which is mildly spicy and smoky, but not nearly as strong as chipotle.
  2. Makrut lime leaves are indigenous to Southeast Asia. Many of the trees now thrive in Hawaii. They have a citrus-like, floral aroma and impart a unique flavor.

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